Baker Beach, San Francisco

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Baker Beach is a public beach on the Pacific side of the San Francisco Peninsula, California. The 160 acre (65 ha) property was first settled by John Henry Baker in the 1850s and was known as Golden Gate Milk Ranch. Baker Beach is now part of the Presidio.

The Presidio of San Francisco, originally called El Presidio Real de San Francisco, is a park and former U.S. Army fort occupying the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula. It had been a fortified location since September 17, 1776, when New Spain established the presidio to gain a foothold in Alta California and the San Francisco Bay. It passed to Mexico in 1810 after the Mexican War of Independence, and was turned over to the United States after the Mexican-American War in 1848. As part of a 1989 military reduction program, the U.S. Congress voted to end the Presidio's status as an active military installation and on October 1, 1994, it was transferred to the National Park Service, ending 219 years of military use.

A prominent war relict at the north end of Baker Beach is Battery Chamberlin. The gun battery was first built in 1904 with four six-inch rifled guns mounted on disappearing carriages and was intended to protect underwater minefields laid outside the Golden Gate. These guns had a maximum range of 7.5 miles (12 km), and crews were trained to fire two rounds per minute. In 1920, these were replaced with two six-inch guns mounted on carriages. During World War II, these guns were manned by the Sixth Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense) Regiment that lived on-site until the end of the war. The battery was covered with camouflage netting to hide it from air attack. These guns were removed in 1948. Read more here and here. Explore more of Baker Beach here: